Canadian Positive People Network (CPPN)

Réseau canadien des personnes séropositives (RCPS)

The CPPN acknowledges that its corporate office in Peterborough (ON) sits on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe Missis​sauga adjacent to Haudenosaunee Territory and in the Territory covered by the Williams Treaty, and that its operations and management office sits on the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin Anishnaabeg people.  We recognize and deeply appreciate the contributions that Métis, Inuit, and other Indigenous Peoples have made to shape and strengthen our local communities, our provinces and territories, and our country as a whole.

Le RCPS reconnaît que son bureau principal à Peterborough (ON) est situé sur le territoire traditionnel de la Anishinaabe Mississauga adjacent au territoire de Haudenosaunee et sur le territoire couvert par le traité Williams, et que son bureau des opérations et de gestion se trouve sur le territoire traditionnel non cédé du Peuple Algonquin Anishnaabeg. Nous reconnaissons et apprécions profondément les contributions des Métis, des Inuits et des autres peuples autochtones à la formation et au renforcement de nos communautés locales, de nos provinces et territoires et de notre pays dans son ensemble.

AIDS 2020 | Sida 2020

Communications, media, and social marketing

Our 5-year plan outlines communications, media, and social marketing activities that are designed to reach and/or extend reach to "priority populations" with a view to implementing strategies and social marketing campaigns which challenge assumptions and influence changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviours,

More specifically

The CPPN will facilitate opportunities for people living with HIV and HIV co-infections, partners and allies, and relevant community-based stakeholders to develop and enhance their skills and capacity to:


  • Understand and debate policy and practice and the impact and implications on the well-being and quality of life of people living with HIV and HIV co-infections;
  • Build skills/develop capacity to contribute effectively to policy and practice development and implementation efforts and interventions; and,
  • Speak with confidence and credibility as experts and advocates on the impact and implications of evidence on policy and practice to a wide range of audiences (e.g., peers, community-based representatives, politicians and political decision-makers, the media, members of the general public, etc.).

While not necessarily exclusive to the following, our activities will focus on these areas of interest:


  1. Greater inclusion and meaningful engagement of people living with HIV and HIV co-infections (GIPA/MEPA): why is it important?  Taking stock, sharing successes, and identifying ongoing needs and gaps.  Identifying and understanding health and social issues which affect our well-being and quality of life; navigating “systems”; learning how to be effective advocates for our own needs.  Our activities will challenge us to answer these questions: (1) what do we need to do to promote the importance and ensure the practical application of the GIPA/MEPA principle(s) within and outside of the HIV and HIV co-infections communities?; and (2) how do systemic barriers to "wrap-around" care and support (prevention, testing and diagnosis, and treatment) affect us - what gets in the way and why, how do we bridge the gap and break the barriers down?

  2. Determinants of health (beyond the diseases-specific paradigm): identifying and understanding health and social issues which affect our well-being and quality of life; navigating “systems”; learning how to be effective advocates for our own needs.  We will work together to identify and articulate (1) which social determinants of health most affect us; why; and, what we need to do to be effective "change agents", AND (2) what we know (or don't know) about persons with disabilities, and how sensitive are we to their unique circumstances, needs, and priorities.

  3. Lived/living experience and peer-based approaches to social marketing (and social media): the lived/living experience of people living with HIV and HIV co-infections, and the lived/living experiences of people affected by (including family, friends, loved ones who are not positive) and people at-risk of infection IS evidence: we are experts! Our work with CPPN members and key community partners will aim to help us learn how we can and should work together to develop and deliver social marketing campaigns that are relevant to our “real-time/real-space” needs and priorities, and how can we work together to effectively put social media to work for us and with us.  We acknowledge that programming and community-based services need to be evidence-informed.  So, our activities will focus on: (1) what we have learned; (2) how our communities respond to the evidence; (3) what needs to happen next; (4) answering the question, "how meaningfully engaged are we, and how do we change it if the answer is less than "very much"?; and, (5) what we need, why we need it, and how we effectively advocate for national pharmacare.

  4. Building and sustaining effective partnerships: understanding how and why we need to develop and foster effective partnerships (with each other, with our communities, with our allies, with funding agencies, with governments, etc.); identifying our partnership successes and challenges to-date; building strategies focused on building and maintaining future partnerships and collaborative relationships.

  5. Testing and diagnosis: identifying and debating ethical concerns and considerations; building strategies to ensure that nobody is left behind.

  6. Aging and syndemic health concerns: challenging assumptions, thinking about, and building strategies to deal with health issues which are NOT directly related or linked to our HIV or HIV co-infections

  7. Harm reduction: where it's working; why it works; what can we do as responsible advocates to promote its value?